Platitudinal

22 January 2004 at 20:48 Leave a comment

What is it with people who speak in platitudes? They can roll them out, one after another, as if sincerity were best measured by sounding as much like everyone else as possible.

Well, maybe it’s because people only want to trust people who seem to be like them. And if you’re untrustworthy, a platitude may be your only friend.

But are all ‘platitudinists’ liars, or just the ones I know? I find that these little trite phrases are really a disguise for hiding true sentiment and to endear themselves falsely to people they really just want to use.

And why do platitudinists hate me? (Oh, right, I hate them).

And why can’t I do ‘small talk’? And does any of this have to do with the fact that I imagined that when I grew up I would smoke cigars, drink brandy and be tall and skinny?

Where did that come from?

And are rhetorical questions better than platitudes?

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Entry filed under: misanthropy.

Trixie, Nancy, et al Spring fever

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What I’ve been reading:

  • James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, L.L.D. (London, 14 King William Street, Strand: William P. Nimmo, 1876). 3 years ago
  • Marsilio Ficino, Letters of Marsilio Ficino, v. 3, trans. Language Dept. School of Economic Science, London (New York: Gingko Press, 1985). 4 years ago
  • Italo Calvino, Six Memos for the Next Millennium (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988). 4 years ago
  • Stephanie Kallos, Broken for You (New York: Grove Press, 2004). 4 years ago
  • Marsilio Ficino, Letters of Marsilio Ficino, v. 2, trans. Language Dept. School of Economic Science, London (New York: Gingko Press, 1985) 4 years ago

T. Anderson Painter

I am a misanthrope. No one ever believes me, but this seems to prove my point.

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2003-2013 T. Anderson Painter
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