an American in Paris

12 March 2004 at 16:49 Leave a comment

We had our first visit from an American since we moved to Paris, and I think I’ve answered a riddle that’s bothered me since we first moved to France: why do American’s frequently act like jerks, as they would never do if they were in the States.

I’ve seen it time and again. People are rude even by American etiquette, forget trying to understand French etiquette. Louder than need be at restaurants and bars, demanding of special treatment and service – and let’s not get into the walking up to people and just talking English to them.

But I finally figured it out: it’s the entrance fee.

They’ve paid for a plane ticket, the price of admission, if you will, and they want something for their money.

France has to deliver.

Just a thought.

Oh, and just so there is no misunderstanding, my American guest was very well behaved.  There was the rapping of the Missy Elliott song on the Metro, but it was a in good fun. You expect that kind of thing on the Metro.

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Entry filed under: Paris.

Mon-iacle Another Midwesterner in Paris

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What I’ve been reading:

  • James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, L.L.D. (London, 14 King William Street, Strand: William P. Nimmo, 1876). 4 years ago
  • Marsilio Ficino, Letters of Marsilio Ficino, v. 3, trans. Language Dept. School of Economic Science, London (New York: Gingko Press, 1985). 4 years ago
  • Italo Calvino, Six Memos for the Next Millennium (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988). 4 years ago
  • Stephanie Kallos, Broken for You (New York: Grove Press, 2004). 5 years ago
  • Marsilio Ficino, Letters of Marsilio Ficino, v. 2, trans. Language Dept. School of Economic Science, London (New York: Gingko Press, 1985) 5 years ago

T. Anderson Painter

I am a misanthrope. No one ever believes me, but this seems to prove my point.

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