Heroism

13 March 2004 at 16:29 Leave a comment

It was just after 1:00 in the morning and we’d missed our last Metro (by minutes). We’d even given up coffee and dessert to try and make it! But that will happen if your reservation is for 10:30.

But we were at a taxi stand and none came and none came and none came, but more and more people did. One began to feel you would be spending the night there. Lots of taxis drove by, but they were all full…

Then, one at the end of the next block had its light on and was pulled over. My American friend went into a sprint, never mind the high heels! Never mind her blisters from walking all over Paris the day before! Never mind the jet lag!

Unfortunately, before she even got there, he turned his light off.

He was on break.

Sigh.

We did manage later to find one, but I will never forget her selfless act of heroism…

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Entry filed under: Paris.

Metro v. bus truth v. evil

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What I’ve been reading:

  • James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, L.L.D. (London, 14 King William Street, Strand: William P. Nimmo, 1876). 4 years ago
  • Marsilio Ficino, Letters of Marsilio Ficino, v. 3, trans. Language Dept. School of Economic Science, London (New York: Gingko Press, 1985). 4 years ago
  • Italo Calvino, Six Memos for the Next Millennium (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988). 4 years ago
  • Stephanie Kallos, Broken for You (New York: Grove Press, 2004). 5 years ago
  • Marsilio Ficino, Letters of Marsilio Ficino, v. 2, trans. Language Dept. School of Economic Science, London (New York: Gingko Press, 1985) 5 years ago

T. Anderson Painter

I am a misanthrope. No one ever believes me, but this seems to prove my point.

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