Posts filed under ‘think’

Agreed

The blog is dead, long live the blog.

“I am not generally a bomb-thrower, but I wrote this piece in a deliberately provocative way. Blogs obviously aren’t dead and I acknowledged that much right from the title. I (obviously) think there’s a lot of value in the blog format, even apart from its massive influence on online media in general, but as someone who’s been doing it since 1998 and still does it every day, it’s difficult to ignore the blog’s diminished place in our informational diet.
“Through various blogrolls (remember those?) and RSS readers, I used to keep up with hundreds of blogs every day and over a thousand every week. Now I read just two blogs daily…”

Jason Kottke

I tried to use a blogroll on a site I read regularly and many of the links were dead (and they have gone unnoticed, unremoved). I noticed when another blog I read removed their blogroll that I regularly used, but that site can no longer really be called a blog, though it still has one as a component.

And as I looked up something online today that I knew very little about I found only one helpful source: wikipedia.

There was a time that you would find 5-10 sites of varying reliability and quality, but there was variety.

The internet is shrinking.

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23 January 2014 at 10:42 Leave a comment

writers and sociability

Alice Munro is retiring:

In 1994, she told the Paris Review: “It’s not the giving up of the writing that I fear. It’s the giving up of this excitement or whatever it is that you feel that makes you write. This is what I wonder: what do most people do once the necessity of working all the time is removed? Even the retired people who take courses and have hobbies are looking for something to fill this void, and I feel such horror of being like that and having that kind of life. The only thing that I’ve ever had to fill my life has been writing. So I haven’t learned how to live a life with a lot of diversity. The only other life I can imagine is a scholarly life, which I probably idealise.”

but now…

“I’m delighted. Not that I didn’t love writing, but I think you do get to a stage where you sort of think about your life in a different way. And perhaps, when you’re my age, you don’t wish to be alone as much as a writer has to be. It’s like, at the wrong end of life, sort of becoming very sociable,” she said.

21 June 2013 at 10:33 Leave a comment

precious all-caps…

http://www.salon.com/2012/10/03/marissa_mayer_can_work_if_she_wants/

3 October 2012 at 14:43 Leave a comment

tools of writing

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2012/10/the-writing-revolution/309090/3/?single_page=true

“A history teacher got more granular. He pointed out that the students’ sentences were short and disjointed. What words, Scharff asked, did kids who wrote solid paragraphs use that the poor writers didn’t? Good essay writers, the history teacher noted, used coordinating conjunctions to link and expand on simple ideas—words like for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so. Another teacher devised a quick quiz that required students to use those conjunctions. To the astonishment of the staff, she reported that a sizable group of students could not use those simple words effectively. The harder they looked, the teachers began to realize, the harder it was to determine whether the students were smart or not—the tools they had to express their thoughts were so limited that such a judgment was nearly impossible.”

1 October 2012 at 08:53 Leave a comment

wrongful

http://www.psmag.com/legal-affairs/red-flags-early-warnings-of-wrongful-convictions-45854/

8 September 2012 at 12:53 Leave a comment

“all your best Alice Munros are women”

http://www.theawl.com/2012/08/the-critics-who-explain-things#more

24 August 2012 at 04:25 Leave a comment

This.

http://www.salon.com/2012/08/14/how_do_strip_clubs_hurt_me/

14 August 2012 at 06:58 Leave a comment

Older Posts


What I’ve been reading:

  • James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, L.L.D. (London, 14 King William Street, Strand: William P. Nimmo, 1876). 4 years ago
  • Marsilio Ficino, Letters of Marsilio Ficino, v. 3, trans. Language Dept. School of Economic Science, London (New York: Gingko Press, 1985). 4 years ago
  • Italo Calvino, Six Memos for the Next Millennium (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988). 4 years ago
  • Stephanie Kallos, Broken for You (New York: Grove Press, 2004). 5 years ago
  • Marsilio Ficino, Letters of Marsilio Ficino, v. 2, trans. Language Dept. School of Economic Science, London (New York: Gingko Press, 1985) 5 years ago

T. Anderson Painter

I am a misanthrope. No one ever believes me, but this seems to prove my point.

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